Awwww.

It’s a festive time machine!

I know it’s been said many times before, but I do think it’s charming that Britain’s most famous spaceship is a police box. None of these newfangled lasers, curves, or warp nacelles here, oh no. Just good-old fashioned wood and a Time Vortex, that’s all you need.

Secondly, will the Girls Aloud album just LEAK, dammit? At this rate, I’ll actually have to wait until the release date to hear it…grr…

(Bonnie’s apposite review of See The Day: “A cynical stab at the Christmas market!” Ah, Mark. Lard. How we miss you…)

currently playing: The Art of Noise – Moments In Love

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRGGGGGGHHHH!

WE’RE ALL GOING TO DIE! AT ONE MINUTE PAST MIDNIGHT, THE COUNTRY IS GOING TO BE ENGULFED IN A FLOOD OF ALCOHOL! RUN! SAVE YOURSELF! MINE’S A VODKA AND COKE!

currently playing: The National – Mr. November

Blah.

Post-holiday blog malaise, I’m afraid. I could write about how, even after corrupting Simon Popworld and turning him to a life of mobile-phone theft, Lady Sovereign’s “Save The Hoodie” campaign is stalling somewhere in the Top 60 this week. Or perhaps about the Xbox 360, which apparently comes with a power supply the size of a bungalow and yet another version of FIFA to show off those NEXT-GEN! graphics abilities.

Or maybe about how, just like The Arcade Fire before them, I just don’t get the appeal of Clap Your Hands Say Yeah! I could mention how much I’ve enjoyed watching the first four episodes of Veronica Mars, and how different it is to watch a TV show via a box set rather than, say, broadcasts.

Instead, I’ll leave you with a Soviet map of Manchester, and be on my way, I think.

currently playing: Paddy McAloon – I’m 49

Break Out The Sweaters!

The campaign to get My Ever-Changing Moods performed at the Brit Awards starts here!

currently playing: The Sundays – More

Reason To Hate Britain, Part 123

You what? No, seriously, when did Norman Tebbit replicate himself?

currently playing: Propaganda – Dream Within a Dream

STATION!

Film #3!

Easily the third best film ever!

(behind Transformers: The Movie and WarGames, obviously)

currently playing: Rachel Stevens — I Said Never Again

The Comeback Starts Here!

What ever happened to…?

currently playing: Gang Of Four – Contract

Hmm, Those Poor Children In Need

Madonna to Status Quo is a BIG drop in quality…

currently playing: Children In Need

There Are Times…

There are times when you just want to shake your head and walk away with a sad face. Then there are other times when you feel that the best bet would be to napalm people. For example, when Ronan Keating thought it would be a good idea to cover Fairytale of New York.

This is one of the latter times. I know, I know, keep an open mind and everything, but there’s no way this can be anything but embarrassing, really…

currently playing: A Camp – Song for the Leftovers

Oh, Sony, So Much To Answer For

Before I left for America, I made a post about copy-protected CDs. While I was away, there was some rather big news on that front, in that for the past year, Sony has been shipping CDs that install a rootkit on Windows machines. And not just any rootkit, but one that cloaks itself and provides a mechanism for Sony to inject hidden code onto your computer. And, by an amazing coincidence, so can anybody else who discovers Sony’s method. There are now several viruses and trojans floating around the Internet that abuse this feature to infect computers afflicted with the Sony software. This means that your computer may, even now, be part of what’s called a ‘botnet’ and participating in computer attacks worldwide.

After an initial response from Sony of “most users don’t know what a rootkit is, so why should they worry about it?”, they eventually offered a fix, possibly because of the large amount of negative press being generated worldwide. As far as I know, though, they still haven’t provided a list of all the CDs that have this ‘protection’ included.

Amazingly, though, the fix doesn’t remove the rootkit, it only updates a few files, and removes the additional cloaking feature (or changes it, as Sony hasn’t released details of what their fix actually does). Oh, and as a bonus side-effect, it actually makes your computer even more susceptible to attack from outside. Hurrah for Sony!

Today, though, things got even stranger. Because Sebastian Porst and Matti Nikki disassembled Sony’s code, discovering something rather curious: the rootkit contains code from the open source MP3 encoder LAME, in a possible violation of the program’s LGPL violation, and VideoLAN’s FairPlay’s circumvention code, in a clear violation of that program’s licence (GPL) (even more amusingly, that code’s sole purpose is to get around Apple’s iTunes protection, possibly opening the door for Apple to sue Sony under the DMCA in the USA).

But how widespread is the infection? Well, happily, Sony provided a way of answering that potentially difficult question. Because, just to pile on misery, the rootkit also talks to Sony’s servers to display advertising banners while you enjoy the privilege of listening to music that you’ve bought. Dan Kaminsky, who has in the past managed to bend the DNS specification to do all sorts of amazing things, looked at a list of DNS nameservers to make a rough guess of how many computers were asking for the banners. This is Planet Sony.

And finally, the company that supplied the software for Sony’s CDs is called First4Internet. It’s based somewhat close to home, in fact just up the road in Banbury. Perhaps now would be a time to recount some of the Computer Misuse Act of 1990:

3.—(1) A person is guilty of an offence if —
(a) he does any act which causes an unauthorised modification of the contents of any computer; and
(b) at the time when he does the act he has the requisite intent and the requisite knowledge

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1)(b) above the requisite intent is an intent to cause a modification of the contents of any computer and by so doing—
(a) to impair the operation of any computer;
(b) to prevent or hinder access to any program or data held in any computer; or
© to impair the operation of any such program or the reliability of any such data.

(3) The intent need not be directed at—
(a) any particular computer;
(b) any particular program or data or a program or data of any particular kind; or
© any particular modification or a modification of any particular kind.

So, do you think we should call the police?

currently playing: New Order – The Perfect Kiss